If you’re looking for tradition with your dim sum, don’t bother going to Phat’s Dumpling House in District 2 because that’s not what it serves. Instead, Phat’s serves a modern interpretation of dim sum that works.


Although Thuong Tra opened only three months ago, the concept dates back to 2010, when Nguyen Viet Bac opened his first teahouse. Inspired while travelling through the mountainous areas of northern Vietnam, Bac knew he needed to bring the traditional tea culture to Hanoi, while giving the practice the respect it deserved. He admired the art of tea ceremonies, and decided to create his own place where everyone could enjoy tea from all around Vietnam, in the heart of Hanoi.

A miniature artery from District 1 to District 5, Pham Viet Chanh is one of Saigon’s most hectic streets. Motorbikes scream down this road, cars make no apologies, local businesses line one side, a rather alarming hospital sits back from the tarmac, and in the middle of it all is a little slice of quiet, polite delicacy — 1985 Cafe.

Nestled between aluminium walls and busy advertisements on the corner of Au Co and Xuan Dieu is a bar that has no name.

What is the best street food available in Hanoi? Here’s what we think. Words by Huyen Tran

Stacked above Maison Marou Chocolate, Café-Restaurant occupies a sought-after location in a French colonial building on Calmette. With a spectacular view over Ben Thanh Market and the northwestern part of District 1, the building has been carefully restored and preserved. It’s a combination of old architecture and contemporary décor, with traditional tiles interleaved with a modern resin floor, oak furniture with blue cushions, large windows and classic hanging lamps.

Highly rated by its regulars, Baba’s is one of those Indian restaurants that draws in the customers. So what’s the secret? Our mystery diner finds out. Photos by Bao Zoan

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